Interactive Map

Hogganfield Park

Hogganfield Park is managed by Glasgow City Council. The lochside path is great for a gentle stroll – or a more energetic run. Click here for more information about the park.

Hogganfield Loch is Glasgow’s best site for wintering water birds such as whooper swan and goldeneye duck. The loch and surrounding parkland became a local nature reserve in 1998. Find out more about wildlife in the park here.

The 'Friend's of Glasgow's Local Nature Reserves' work with the council to help look after these important places.

Who's round?

Lethamhill Golf Course is an 18-hole parkland course managed by Glasgow Life. It can be booked on a pay-and-play basis here.

Gateway centre

We have plans to upgrade the existing building and car park to create a Seven Lochs Gateway Centre with views over the loch.

The centre will offer information and interpretation, act as a Park Ranger base, and provide classroom space for school groups. Other planned facilities include a cafe and bike hire.

Walk, run, cycle!

Walking, running and cycling on the well-surfaced path around the loch edge are the main activities. Around the loch you’ll find picnic benches, a beach, play areas and an angling zone.

The circuit around the loch is marked with ‘distance posts’ to help you measure your run, and there is also an orienteering course around the park. The park hosts a range of organised activities, including regular fitness sessions, guided walks and family activities.

Click here to view a guided Phototrail of The Seven Lochs Trail Hogganfield & Cardowan Moss walk

Bustling birdlife

Hogganfield loch attracts a host of water birds in both winter and summer. In autumn Icelandic whooper swan arrive after flying hundreds, sometimes thousands, of miles from their arctic breeding grounds. In spring Great Crested Grebe arrive to breed, and perform their amazing courtship dance. A viewing platform near the car park is a great place to witness the loch’s bustling birdlife.

Keep up to date with Hogganfield's amazing birdlife - and other wildlife around Glasgow - on the Glasgow's Wild's Better blog.

Deep freeze

In Victorian times local people collected ice from Hogganfield Loch to help keep food fresh. This was stopped in 1866 due to the risk of accidents and the City Corporation built two ice houses on the loch edge where ice could be bought for a small sum.

From Mediaval times right up until the early 19th century water from Hogganfield Loch was also used to power mills along the Molindinar burn.

Camera, action!

We will to continue to improve the loch for wildlife by planting reeds and other wetland plants around the loch edge.

We also hope to create artificial islands – including some with nest cameras linked to the planned Gateway Centre – to provide safe nesting places for water birds.

More wildlife!

The woodlands, marsh and grassland within the park are managed to encourage wildlife. In the early morning it’s not unusual to see small groups of roe deer at the woodland edge, and in spring skylark can be heard singing over the meadow areas. Water vole – one of Scotland’s rarest mammals – are found in the ponds and ditches around the loch.

Frankfield

The muddy edges of Frankfield Loch make it a great place for wading birds like snipe and lapwing.

South of the Loch, Cardowan Moss is the park’s biggest woodland, with miles of well-surfaced paths to explore on foot or by bike.

Lapwing

Walk in the woods

The good network of recently upgraded paths at Cardowan Moss offer lots of opportunities for walking, cycling and wildlife watching. Some of the paths are steep, but to the south of Frankfield Loch you’re rewarded with a great view of the Campsie Fells.

Cardowan Moss is one of 5 Commonwealth Woods in the Seven Lochs area. You can download a site information leaflet here. There is also a Cardowan Moss phototrail giving detailed accessibility information.

Reserve a space

We hope to create a new local nature reserve at Frankfield Loch, including a new path around the loch, viewing areas, signage and interpretation.

We also hope to work with local residents and schools to put up bird boxes and plant wildflowers.

'The Froggy'

The mix of old and young trees at Cardowan Moss make it a great place for woodland birds. Buzzards are often seen soaring over the trees, water vole are found in the many ponds and ditches, and locals know this area as ‘The Froggy’ for obvious reasons!

Find out more about wildlife at Cardowan Moss here.

Wet and wild

This large area of woodland, grassland and reed bed is a great place for newts, frogs and toads. The road next to the loch has tunnels under it to help these amphibians get to the loch without the risk of getting squashed!

Our plans include a new path link through this area to Stepps station.

Bog restoration

We have plans to restore and improve this raised bog area by installing dams. This will keep the bog wet and help the rare mosses and other plants to survive and thrive.

Installed dams

Not only a bog

This small area of lowland raised bog shows what much of the Seven Lochs area would have been like a thousand years ago.

Raised bogs are one of the most threatened habitats in Scotland. They are important not only for their unique wildlife, but also because they absorb carbon dioxide and help combat climate change.

Gartloch

The Gartloch pools are some of the best wetland habitat the park has to offer, and the fantastic medieval Provan Hall – one of the oldest surviving buildings in Glasgow - has many tales to tell about the area over the last 500 years.

Medieval magic

Dating back to the 1460s, the two houses and enclosed courtyard of Provan Hall is regarded as the best-preserved medieval fortified country house in Scotland. Provan Hall is linked to many events in the history of Glasgow, and the estate linked to Provan Hall once stretched from Shettleston out to Springburn and Bishop Loch.

Provan Hall is owned by the National Trust for Scotland, and is run by Glasgow City Council in partnership with the Friends of Provan Hall. it is open Monday to Friday  Guided tours can be arranged.

Auchinlea Park

Auchinlea Park is one of the more formal parks in the Seven Lochs area – and is easy to get to from Glasgow Fort shopping centre if you need an escape from shopping. There are well surfaced paths and a recently upgraded kid’s play area.

At Provan Hall you can learn about Glasgow’s medieval past and some of the colourful characters associated with the area. There is also a small cafe and toilets. Click here for more information.

Visitor centre

We aim to restore Provan Hall to show what it would have been like in medieval times. We have plans to build a new Visitor Centre to tell the story of the house and its inhabitants over the last 500 years.

The Visitor Centre will provide information, interpretation and other visitor facilities, and host a range of visitor and community activities.

Todd's Well

Todd’s Well woodland may be small, but the mix of trees and hedgerows make it a great place for nature. It’s a short walk around the woodland, although some of the paths are quite steep, and there are great views north over Cardowan Moss and out to the Campsies, and east to Bishop Loch and beyond.

You can also follow a Commonwealth Woods Treasure Trail around Todds Well.

Gartloch pools

The muddy edges of gartloch pools provide food for wading birds like sandpiper and snipe. In spring the marsh and reed beds around Gartloch Pools are one place where you might hear the strange pig-like grunts and squeals of a water rail.

Reserve a place

We are working to create a new local nature reserve at Gartloch pools. This will include creating new wetland habitats, constructing boardwalks and improving paths.

Johnston

The wetlands around Johnston Loch and the woodland and heathland either side of the railway between Stepps and Gartcosh are one of the wildest parts of the wetland park - home to roe deer, water vole and buzzard.

Nature takes over

Since the mine closed the old bings of the Cardowan Colliery have been taken over by a mix of grassland and woodland. The bings are now home to lots of small mammals, and you may see a kestrel hovering over the grassland, or the ghost-like shape of a barn owl hunting at dusk.

The small pond between the bings is home to many kinds of duck – including teal and tufted duck.

Pit stop

Cardowan colliery dominated this area from 1924 until the early 1980s. On 16th Nov 1932 a huge explosion caused the deaths of 11 miners.

When the pit closed the steam driven winder was dismantled and is now displayed at the industrial museum in Summerlee Heritage Park, Coatbridge.

Bog restoration

Peatland areas can help combat climate change as they absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and help to reduce greenhouse gases. We hope to restore some of the peatland at Garnkirk and Heathfield Moss by installing dams and removing trees.

Garnkirk moss

Garnkirk Moss is the largest area of peatland in the Seven Lochs. Old photos show that this area was once used to supply peat for industry, and although this has unfortunately left some of the peatland in poor condition, the atmospheric mix of birch woodland, heathland and wetland means it is still one of the wilder parts of the park.

Path plans

We hope to improve access by completing a path around Johnston Loch – with links to other path networks in the Seven Lochs area. In the long term we hope to improve access across the railway line between Gartcosh and Stepps.

Johnston Loch

The wooded margins of Johnston Loch make it a great place for coot, moorhen and various types of duck. In summer the loch has a fantastic display of water lilies. The loch is also a trout fishery – so you’ll often see fisherman casting their lines across the water.

Bishop

At the heart of the Seven Lochs, Bishop Loch is surrounded by one of the largest freshwater reed beds in central Scotland.

Three woodlands in this area are Commonwealth Woods managed by Forestry Commission Scotland. These attractive, accessible woodland nature reserves are great places for walking and cycling. Find out more, and download site maps and leaflets here.

Walk in the woods

West Maryston wood is looked after by the Forestry Commission Scotland. New and upgraded paths make these woodlands a great place for walking and cycling. Click here for a site map and leaflet.

Walk in the woods

Bishop Loch local nature reserve is looked after by Forestry Commission Scotland. New and upgraded paths make it a great place for walking and cycling. Click here for a site map and leaflet.

There are also 3 short 'medal routes' around the site. You can download the map and route information here.

Bigger and better

We hope to extend Bishop Loch local nature reserve to include all of the Site of Special Scientific Interest.

This will include work to create wetland and woodland habitats, new paths and boardwalks, and visitor facilities such as interpretation boards and viewing areas.

Gartloch Hospital

The towers of Gartloch Hospital are a central feature of the Seven Lochs. Built in 1892-96 as the ‘City of Glasgow District Asylum for pauper lunatics’ the hospital was in use until the 1980s.

Some remaining buildings are now being converted into housing as part of a major new development. 

A special place

Bishop Loch is one of two ‘Sites of Special Scientific interest’ in the Seven Lochs Park. A number of very rare birds have been spotted around Bishop Loch, including a marsh harrier, osprey and, most recently, a bittern. If we can improve habitats in the Seven Lochs in the right way perhaps they’ll stay!

Bishop's palace

The country residence of the Bishop of Glasgow stood on the edge of Bishop Loch from the 14th Century until it was destroyed in 1579.

Archaeological investigations here have found remains of a moat and wall, as well as medieval coins and pottery.

Wet and wild

Commonhead Moss local nature reserve is Glasgow’s largest area of lowland raised bog. This wetland wilderness hosts an amazing variety of wildlife, including carnivorous sundew plants and fast flying dragonflies.

Birch woodlands around the bog are home to two rare butterflies – the green hairstreak and the small pearl-bordered fritillary.

The 'Friend's of Glasgow's Local Nature Reserves' work with the council to help look after these important places.

Over the M73

We have plans to improve walking and cycling links across the M73. This will include a re-opened underpass along the route of the Monklands Canal, and a new green bridge linking Commonhead Moss with Drumpellier Country Park. 

Garnqueen

Garnqueen Loch adds a natural beauty to the well-used Glenboig Village Park. West of Glenboig, Gartcosh local nature reserve was created at the former Gartcosh steel works to provide a home for Scotland’s largest population of great crested newt.

Green routes

As part of a new green route linking Glenboig and Gartcosh we are investigating the opportunity to create new walking and cycling access under the M73 linked to the Bothlin burn.

A village park

Opened in 2004, Glenboig Village Park is a great example of local community action to improve green spaces. As well as a well-equipped play area there are woodland paths which take you up to the remains of Inchneuk Tower and offer great views over the surrounding farmland.

Click here to download a leaflet.

Industrial nature

When the Gartcosh Steel Works closed in 1986 Scotland's largest population of the rare great crested newt was discovered in small ponds and wetland areas across the old stelworks site. 

The ponds and wetlands of Gartcosh local nature reserve are now home to a thriving populations of great crested newt, and provide habitat for other amphibians, water vole, dragonflies and wetland plants. You can download a site leaflet here.

Glenboig fireclay

The industrial revolution had a huge impact in this area. The opening of mines and factories saw Glenboig’s population soar from 120 in 1860 to over 1500 in 1890.

Through 19th and early 20th centuries the Glenboig Fireclay works on the edge of Garnqueen Loch produced thousands of tonnes of bricks and tiles.

Glenboig Life Centre

Glenboig Neighbourhood House are transforming an old community centre on the edge of Garnqueen Loch into a new ‘Life Centre’.

We will work with them to develop the centre as a gateway to the Seven Lochs, including heritage interpretation, education activities and volunteer projects.

New development

There are plans for new housing developments around Glenboig.

We will work with planners and house-builders to link this new housing to the Seven Lochs Wetland Park by creating a connected network of paths and green corridors.

Drumpellier

The woodland, loch side paths and Visitor Centre make Drumpellier Country Park a great family day out. Lochend Loch is also the site of an Iron Age Crannog – and evidence of human activity in the area goes back almost 12,000 years.

Click here to view a guided Phototrail of an accessible route around Drumpellier Country Park 

A special place

Woodend Loch is protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest. This means it is one of the best examples of its kind in Scotland.

The loch is home to a number of rare plants and water beetles, a good variety of waterbirds, and is a known site for otters.

Drumpellier nature

The variety of trees and shrubs make Drumpellier woods a great place for woodland birds. In spring they come alive with birdsong as migrating birds return form southern Europe and Africa to breed.

Look out for brightly coloured bullfinch and goldfinch at the woodland edge, and buzzards soaring over the trees.

Gateway centre

We have plans to develop the existing Visitor Centre as a Gateway to the Seven Lochs Park. New interpretation and education facilities will focus on the park's wildlife and history. We also hope to create a crannog themed play area.

Iron Age living

Lochend Loch is one of two known crannog sites in the Seven Lochs area.

Crannogs are Iron Age dwelling houses built over open water, with a bridge to link them to the shore. The position of the crannog is marked by coloured buoys.  

Drumpellier Country Park

Drumpellier Country Park was recently awarded a Trip Advisor Certificate of Excellence. With miles of lochside and woodland paths to explore, as well as play areas and a Visitor Centre, it makes a great family day out.

Drumpellier Country Park is managed by North Lanarkshire Council. The Visitor Centre includes a cafe and meeting room, and there are regular activities run by the Countryside Ranger Service.  Boats can be hired at the Visitor Centre during the summer months.

Monkland canal

The Monkland canal, constructed between 1770 and 1790, thrived during the 19th century as a key link between industrial areas of Glasgow, Coatbridge and Airdrie.

Over a million tonnes of coal had been transported on the canal by 1850. However, with the rise of the railways the canal fell out of use, and was closed to navigation in 1952.

The canal is looked after by Scottish Canals - see here for more information.

Canal nature

The open stretch of the Monkland canal from Blair Bridge to Bargeddie makes a pleasant walk or bike ride, with links to Drumpellier Country Park. Look out for moorhen and coot, and if you’re very lucky the bright blue and orange of a kingfisher.

Green links

Our plans also include links from the park to surrounding communities. We are working with Scottish Canals and the Scottish Waterways Trust on a green link from the Seven Lochs to Summerlee Museum of Industrial Life and Coatbridge railway station.

7 Lochs Trail

The Seven Lochs Trail is a new, 8km route linking Drumpellier Country Park and the east end of the Seven Lochs Wetland Park, to Hogganfield Park in the west.

The trail, which uses well surfaced paths and some short sections of pavement, makes for a great walk or bike ride.

Click the nature and heritage links to find our more about what you'll find along the trail.

Hogganfield Loch

Hogganfield Loch attracts a host of water birds in both winter and summer. In autumn Icelandic whooper swan fly in from their arctic breeding grounds. In spring great crested grebe arrive to perform their amazing courtship dance.

You can find out more about the loch’s bustling birdlife, and other wildlife in the park, at Glasgow's Wild's Better.

Cardowan Moss

The mix of old and young trees at Cardowan Moss local nature reserve make it a great place for woodland birds. Buzzards are often seen soaring over the trees and water vole are found in the many ponds and ditches.

A small area of lowland raised bog on the edge of the woodland is home to specialist wetland plants such as bog cotton grass and the carnivorous sundew.

Find out more here.

Provan Hall

With the oldest building dating back to the 1460s, the two houses and enclosed courtyard that make up Provan Hall are regarded as the best-preserved medieval fortified country house in Scotland.

Provan Hall is closely linked to many events in the history of Glasgow, and the Provan Hall estate once stretched from Shettleston out to Springburn and Bishop Loch. Find out more here.

Bishop Loch

The dense reeds at Bishop Loch are great for nesting birds. This is one of the places in the park where you might hear the pig-like grunts and squeals of the water rail.

In spring 2014 one of the UKs rarest birds – the bittern – was seen at Bishop Loch. If we can improve the reed beds in the right way perhaps they’ll stay!

Bishop's Palace

The country residence of the Bishop of Glasgow once stood on the edge of Bishop Loch. Archbishop Beaton was the last resident before fleeing to France in 1560.

The palace was destroyed in 1579 - but archaeological investigations have found remains of a moat and wall, as well as medieval coins and pottery.

Commonhead Moss

This wetland wilderness shows what much of the Seven Lochs area would have been like a thousand years ago. Raised bogs are important not only for their unique wildlife, but also because they absorb carbon dioxide and help combat climate change.

Birch woodlands around the bog are home to two rare butterflies – the green hairstreak and the small pearl-bordered fritillary.

Lochend Crannog

Lochend Loch is one of two known crannog sites in the Seven Lochs area. Crannogs are Iron Age dwelling houses built over open water, with a bridge to link them to the shore.

When the loch was drained in the 1930s an investigation of the Crannog site found human and animal bones, pottery, wooden furniture and jewellery thought to be around 2000 years old.

Lochend loch is in Drumpellier Country Park.